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  MERCHANT SHIPPING (RADIO) RULES, 1975 (LI 1018).

 

IN exercise of the powers conferred on the Commissioner responsible for Shipping by section 181 of the Merchant Shipping Act, 1963 (Act 183), these Rules are made this 6th day of June, 1974.

PART I—GENERAL

Rule 1—Provision of Radio Installations.

(1)  Every ship of Class I and Class II shall be provided with a radio-telegraph installation which shall include the equipment specified in the First Schedule to these Rules.

(2)  Every ship of Class III and Class IV shall be provided with a radio-telephone installation which shall include the equipment specified in Parts I and II of the Second Schedule to these Rules, or with a radio-telegraph installation which shall include the equipment specified in the First Schedule to these Rules:

Provided that the main and reserve radio-telegraph transmitters in such ships may be combined in a single instrument, if that instrument complies with the requirements of Parts I and III of the First Schedule to these Rules.

(3)  Every ship of Class V (a) shall be provided with a radiotelegraph installation which shall include the equipment specified in the First Schedule to these Rules except that fishing vessels which are restricted to operate on the west coast of Africa and do not proceed more than 50 miles from the nearest land shall not be provided with the equipment specified in Parts  III and IV of the said Schedule.

(4) Every ship of Class V (b) shall be provided with a radio-telephone installation which shall include the equipment specified in Parts I and II of the Second Schedule to these Rules, or with a radio-telegraph equipment as prescribed for a ship of Class V (a).

(5) The Commissioner may, subject to the following conditions, exempt any ship from all or any of the requirements of the foregoing provisions:—

(a) where it is shown to his satisfaction that the length of the voyage, the maximum distance of the ship from the shore, the absence of navigational hazards and other conditions affecting safety are such as to render full or, as the case may be, partial application of sub-rules (1), (2), (3) and (4) of this rule, unreasonable or unnecessary;

(b) where it is shown to his satisfaction that exemption from any of the requirements of sub-rules (1), (2), (3) and (4) of this rule shall not affect the general efficiency of the distress service for the safety of ships; and

(c) where exemption is sought for in respect of ship of Class I or Class II, that such ship is provided with radio-telephone installation required under sub-rule (2) of this rule.

Rule 2—Climatic and Durability Tests.

(1) Every equipment prescribed for installation in ships under these Rules other than test measuring instruments provided in accordance with rule 11 or of rule 21 (f) of these Rules shall be free of mechanical defects —

(a) while undergoing vibration test, dry heat test and low temperature test as prescribed in the Third Schedule to these Rules;

(b)  when subjected to damp heat test as prescribed in the Third Schedule to these Rules; and

(c)  immediately after undergoing such other tests as are prescribed in the Third Schedule to these Rules in respect of that equipment.

(2)  Any equipment intended for use in the open or in an open boat shall be such that after undergoing the mould growth test as prescribed in the Third Schedule, no mould growth shall be present on it.

Rule 3—Interference with Reception.

(1) The interference or mechanical noise produced by a radio-installation or by any other equipment in a ship while at sea shall not be such as shall prevent the effective reception of radio signals by means of the radio-installation provided on board in accordance with these Rules.

(2) Any ship which is provided with a radio-telegraph not being an existing installation, shall also be provided with a communal aerial system for all broadcast receivers.

(3)  The requirement for the installation of a communal aerial system may be dispensed with if broadcast receiver aerials do not interfere with the efficiency of such radio-telegraph installation.

Rule 4—High Voltage Parts.

(1)  All parts and wiring of any equipment specified in these Rules in which the direct and the alternating voltages (other than radio frequency voltages) combine at any time to give an instantaneous voltage greater than 50 volts shall be protected from accidental access.

(2)  All parts and wiring of any equipment specified in these Rules (other than the parts and wiring of a rotating machine) in which the direct and the alternating voltage other than radio frequency voltages combine at any time to give an instantaneous voltage greater than —

(a) 50 volts in the case of an equipment specified in the Second and Fourth Schedules; and

(b) 250 volts in the case of any other equipment;

shall be isolated automatically from all sources of electrical energy when the means of protection are removed.

Rule  5—Charging of  Batteries.

(1) Where on any ship batteries are provided as a source of electrical energy for any part of the equipment installed in that ship in accordance with these Rules there shall be provided on board such ship equipment for the charging of such batteries from the ship's main source  of electrical energy.

(2) Such batteries, whether they form part of the main installation or the reserve installation, shall be brought up to the normal fully charged condition daily while such ship is at sea.

PART II—RADIO-TELEGRAPHY

Rule 6—Electrical Independence of  Main and Reserve Radio-Telegraph.

Subject to the provisions or sub-rule (2) of rule 1, the main and reserve radio-telegraph equipment provided on board a ship shall be electrically independent of each other.

Rule 7—Radio-Telegraph Room.

(1)  A radio-telegraph shall be installed in one or more radio-telegraph rooms on board a ship.

(2) A radio-telegraph room shall not be used for purposes other than those associated with the functions and duties of a radio officer.

(3)  A radio-telegraph room shall be: —

(a)  in such a position that there shall be no interference by extraneous noises or otherwise with the effective reception of radio signals;

(b) as high in the ship as practicable so that the greatest possible degree of safety may be achieved;

(c) of such dimensions as may be sufficient to enable efficient operation, at all times of the radio-telegraph equipment installed therein; and

(d) adequately ventilated.

(4) radio-telegraph shall —

(a) be installed in such a position that it shall be protected against interference with its effectiveness by water or by extremes of temperature;

(b) at all times when the ship is at sea, be readily accessible both for immediate use and for repairs.

(5)  A radio-telegraph room shall be provided with—

(a) an efficient two-way means of calling and voice communication with the bridge and any other place from which the ship is normally navigated.  Such means of communication shall be a voice pipe, a telephone or some other means equally efficient and shall be independent of the main communication system of the ship and of the ship's main source of electrical energy;

(b)  a reliable clock equipped with a dial not less than 5 inches in diameter and a concentric seconds hand, the face of which shall be marked to indicate the silence periods. It shall be securely mounted in such a position that the entire dial can be easily and accurately observed from the radio-telegraph operating position and, if the ship is provided with a radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment, from the position normally occupied by a person testing the radio-telegraph auto alarm  equipment;

(c)  an electrical lamp, operated from the reserve source of electrical energy required by sub-rule (2) of rule 10, and permanently arranged so as to be capable of providing adequate illumination of the operating controls of the main and reserve radio-telegraph installations and of the clock; such lamp shall be controlled by two-way switches placed respectively at the entrance of the radio-telegraph room and at the radio-telegraph operating position. The switches shall be clearly labelled to indicate their purpose;

(d)  an additional electric lamp operated from the reserve source of electrical energy provided with a flexible lead of adequate length to enable all parts of the radiotelegraph installation to be easily seen or a flash light;

(e)  a chair capable of being fixed at the radio-telegraph operating position.

(6)  A complete list of spare equipment and spare parts carried on board a ship in accordance with rule 11 shall always be available in the radio-telegraph room and such list shall indicate the location on board where such spare equipment and parts are kept.

(7)  A calibration table or calibration curve for each transmitter and receiver forming part of the radio-telegraph installation shall always be available in every radio-telegraph room, unless the transmitter or, as the case may be, the receiver is directly calibrated.

(8)  A complete diagram of the wiring of the radio-telegraph installation shall always be available in the radio-telegraph room.

(9)  If a separate room is provided on board any ship for operating the reserve radio-telegraph equipment, it shall be provided with such equipment, articles and fittings as prescribed in sub-rules (2) and (3) of this rule.

(10) A radio-telegraph room shall be provided with a manual containing circuit diagrams and other relevant data required for the maintenance of every part of the radio-telegraph installation together with instructions on the use, operation and maintenance of every such part.

(11) There shall be displayed in a radio-telegraph room a card of instructions prescribing the procedure to be followed in transmitting automatically the radio-telegraph alarm signal and the distress call by using —

(a) the reserve telegraph transmitter specified in Part III of the First Schedule to these Rules; and

(b) the automatic keying device specified in Part V of the First Schedule.

Rule 8—Aerials.

(1) Every radio-telegraph ship shall be fitted with a main aerial and a reserve aerial:

Provided that the Commissioner or any other person authorised by him in that behalf may exempt any ship from the requirement of a reserve aerial if he is satisfied that the fitting of such an aerial is impracticable or unreasonable.

(2) Any ship so exempted shall carry —

(a)  if the main aerial is a supported wire aerial, a spare aerial completely assembled for rapid replacement of the main aerial; or

(b)   if the main aerial is not a supported wire aerial, a spare aerial complete with supporting structures which are capable of rapid erection while the ship is at sea.

(3)  In the case of a ship of Class I, Class II or Class III each of the halyards used for supporting the main aerial shall be fitted with a safety loop between the masthead or other aerial support and an aerial insulator.

(4) The safety loop shall consist of part of the halyard not less than 3 feet long, the loop being closed by a link, of not more than 15 inches long, with a breaking load of not more than one-third of the breaking load of the aerial or of the halyard, whichever is less.

(5) A rigging plan of aerials shall always be available in the radio-telegraph room and shall show the following: —

(a) the elevation and plan view of the aerials;

(b)  the measurements of the aerials; and

(c)  the height of the aerials in metres measured in the manner specified in the Tenth Schedule to these Rules.

(6) The main aerial and the reserve aerial, if any, shall, where practicable be so rigged that damage to either shall not affect the efficiency of the other.

(7)  Means shall be provided for quickly connecting —

(a) either the main aerial or the reserve aerial, if any, to the main transmitter and also to the reserve transmitter; and

(b) the main and reserve receivers, the radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment and the loud speaker watch keeping receivers, to any aerial with which they may be required to be used.

Rule 9—Range of Transmitters.

(1) The normal ranges of radio-telegraph transmitters when connected to the main aerial, shall not be less than,

(a) in the case of a ship of Class I, 175 miles for the main transmitter and 150 miles for the reserve transmitter;

(b) in the case of a ship of Class II, 150 miles for the main transmitter and 100 miles for the reserve transmitter;

(c) in the case of a ship of Class II, 100 miles for the main transmitter and 75 miles for the reserve transmitter; and

(d) in the case of a ship of Class IV and fishing vessels of Class V, 75 miles; for both the main and reserve transmitters.

(2) The normal range of a transmitter for the purposes of these Rules shall be determined at the option of the owner of the ship, either by calculation or by test.

(3) Where the normal range of a radio-telegraph transmitter is determined by calculation on a frequency of 500 kc/s, it shall be calculated in the manner specified in the Tenth Schedule to these Rule.

(4)  Where the normal range of a radio-telegraph transmitter, is determined by test it shall be the distance to which signals can be transmitted by such transmitter over the sea by day under normal conditions on a frequency or 500 kc/s so as to set up at the receiver a total root mean square field strength of at least 50 micro volts per metre,

Rule 10—Supply of Electrical Energy.

(1)  In every radio-telegraph ship be available from its main source of electrical energy at all times while the ship is at sea and at all reasonable times while it is in port a supply of electrical energy which shall be adequate for—

(a) the operation of the main radio-telegraph equipment;

(b) testing purposes; and

(c) the charging of batteries which are a source of electrical energy for the radio-telegraph installation.

(2) The voltage of the supply for the main installation shall be within plus or minus 10 per cent of the rated voltage.

(3)  The supply of electrical energy shall, if it is a direct current supply, be of correct polarity and a metre to indicate this shall be fixed in the radio-telegraph room:

Provided that in the case of a ship which is not engaged on an international voyage the supply of electrical energy may be derived from a battery.

(4) Where the supply of electrical energy is derived from battery there shall also be provided a duplicate battery.

(5) The reserve equipment shall be provided with a source of electrical energy independent of the propelling power of the ship and the ship's electrical system.

(6) The reserve equipment and all parts thereof shall be placed as high in the ship as practicable.

(7)  The source of electrical energy provided for the reserve equipment shall preferably consist of accumulator batteries which are capable of being charged from the ship's main source of electrical energy and are under all circumstances, capable of being brought into immediate operation by means of a switch board.

(8)  The switch-board shall be illuminated y an electric lamp and it shall be situated in the radio-telegraph room or as near thereto as possible so as to be readily accessible from the radio-telegraph room.

(9)  The source of electrical energy provided for the reserve equipment shall be or such capacity and shall be maintained, at all times when the ship is at sea, in such a condition so as to be capable of supplying continuously for a period of six hours, whether or not it is in use for any other purpose, a total current equal to the sum of —

(a) the current required to operate the reserve transmitter with the key up;

(b) three-fifths of the difference between the current required to operate the  reserve transmitter with the key down and the current required to operate it with the key up;

(c) the current required to operate the reserve receiver; and

(d) the current consumed by lamps prescribed in this rule and sub-rules (3) (c) and (d) of rule 7.

(10) The reserve source of electrical energy shall at no time be used except for the operation of —

(a)  the reserve transmitter and receiver;

(b) the lamps prescribed in sub-rule (7) of this rule and sub-rule (3) (c) and (d) of rule 7;

(c) the automatic keying device.

(d) the direction finder.

(11) Notwithstanding the provisions of sub-rule (10) of this rule, in any ship of Class III, Class IV or Class V the Commissioner may permit the use of the reserve source of electrical energy to supply electrical energy to any low power emergency circuits which are wholly confined to the upper part of the ship, if he is satisfied that such circuits are capable of being readily disconnected and that the reserve source of electrical energy is capable of supplying the additional load to such circuits without falling below the capacity prescribed in sub-rule (7) of this rule.

Rule 11—Tools, Spare Parts, etc.

Every ship equipped with radio-telegraph shall be provided with such tools, measuring instruments, spare parts and other material as are specified in Part I of the Fifth Schedule to these Rules.

Rule 12—Radio Officers.

(1)  Any radio-telegraph ship which on proceeding to sea is not provided with a radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment as specified in the Sixth Schedule to these Rules, shall be provided with radio officers as follows: —

(a) in the case of ships of Class I, three radio officers;

(b) in the case of ships of Class II,

(i) two radio officers if the ship is expected to remain at sea for not more than 48 hours between two consecutive ports; or

(ii) three radio officers if the ship is to remain at sea for more than 48 hours between two consecutive ports;

(c) in the case of ships of Class III and Class IV,

(i) one radio officer if the ship is to remain at sea for not more than 12 hours between two consecutive ports; or

(ii) two radio officers if the ship is expected to remain at sea for more than 12 hours but not exceeding 48 hours between two consecutive ports; or

(iii) three radio officers if the ship is expected to remain at sea for more than 48 hours between  two consecutive ports;

(d)  in the case of ships of Class V,

(i) one radio officer if the fishing vessel is expected to remain at sea without returning to port for not more than 48 hours; or

(ii)  two radio officers if the fishing vessel is expected more than 48 hours.

(2) Every radio-telegraph ship which on proceeding to sea is provided with a radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment as specified in the Sixth Schedule shall be provided with radio officers as follows:—

(a) in the case of ships of Class 1, two radio officers;

(b)  in the case of ships of Classes II, III, IV and V, one radio officer each.

Rule 13—Qualifications of Radio officers.

(1)  For the purposes of these Rules, no person shall be qualified to be appointed as a radio officer on board a Ghanaian ship unless he holds a valid first or second class certificate of proficiency or competency in radio-telegraphy or a maritime Radio Communication Operators General Certificate granted by —

(a)  the Commissioner or any other authority appointed by him in that behalf  by a notification in the Gazette; or

(b) a competent authority in any other country provided that the Commissioner recognises such certificate of proficiency or competency and authorises the holder thereof to operate radio-telegraph on a ship of Ghanaian registration:

Provided that in the case of a radio-telegraph ship registered in Ghana which is a passenger ship of Class I or Class II, at least one radio officer shall hold a first class certificate or a Radio Communication Operators General Certificate.

(2)  For the purposes of sub-rule (1) of this rule a certificate of proficiency or competency shall remain valid provided that the experience of the holder thereof is not less than three months in every two years' period commencing from the date of issue of the certificate and similar experience thereafter if at no time the interval between subsequent experiences exceeds two years.

(3)  Where the holder of a certificate does not comply with sub-rule (2) of this rule the certificate shall not be deemed to be valid unless the holder satisfies the Director of Posts and telecommunications by re-examination or otherwise that he still possesses all the qualifications stated in his certificate.

(4)  For the purposes of this rule "experience" means experience as the operator of radio-telegraph apparatus —

(i) at sea, as a radio officer, or

(ii)  on land, as an operator at a radio-telegraph station maintained on land by the Posts and Telecommunications Department for communication with ships.

(5)  At least one of the radio officers on board a ship, registered in Ghana of Class I or Class II shall be a  person who has had experience at sea as a radio officer or radio-telegraph operator for a total period of not less than—

(a) two years in the case of ships of Class I;

(b) one year in the case of ships of Class II (a);

(c) six months in the case of ships of Class II (b);

(d) three months in the case of ships of Class II (b) being ships of 1,600 tons gross and upwards but under 3,000 tons gross.

(6) Where a ship other than a ship registered in Ghana is at a port or place in Ghana or within the territorial waters of Ghana, no person shall be deemed to be a radio officer unless he holds a valid certificate of proficiency or competency in radio-telegraphy granted by a competent authority recognised by the laws of the country in which the ship is registered.

Rule 14—Radio Watch.

(1)  Subject to the provisions of sub-rule (2) of this rule and sub-rule (1) of rule 15, radio watch shall be maintained on board every radio-telegraph ship in the following circumstances, that is to say: —

(a)  where a radio-telegraph ship is not provided with a radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment as prescribed in the Sixth Schedule to these Rules, a continuous watch round the clock for twenty-four hours shall be maintained;

(b)  where a radio-telegraphship is provided with a radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment as prescribed in the Sixth Schedule,

(i)  in the case of ships of Class I a watch of sixteen hours, a day shall be maintained at the times specified in column 4 of the Seventh Schedule in relation to the zone in which the ship is; and

(ii) in the case of ships of Classes II, III, IV and V a watch of eight hours a day shall be maintained at the times specified in column 5 of the Seventh Schedule in relation to the zone in which the ship then is.

(2)  Any radio-telegraph auto-alarm-equipment installed in a radio-telegraph ship shall be kept in operation at any time when radio watch is not maintained:

Provided that this sub-rule shall not apply to ships which are fitted with direction finders in accordance with the Merchant Shipping (Direction-Finders) Rules, 1974, during such time when radio bearings are being determined by means of the direction finder if—

(a)  it is proved by test that the aerial of the radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment, when in operation affects the accuracy of radio bearings obtained by means of the direction finder; and

(b) it is impracticable to erect an aerial for the radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment in any position on the ship  without affecting the accuracy of those bearings when the equipment is in operation.

Rule 15—Duties of Radio Officers.

(1)  Every radio officer on duty in a radio-telegraph ship shall keep radio watch by means of headphone reception throughout his period of duty:

Provided that—

(a)  radio watch may be maintained by means of loudspeaker reception, or

(b)  if loud speaker reception is impracticable, radio watch may, except during a silence period, be dispensed with,

for such periods as may be necessary to enable the radio officer to perform other duties in compliance with these rules or with the Merchant Shipping (Direction-Finders) Rules, 1974 (L.I. 950) or to handle traffic on another frequency.

(2)  Subject to rule 14 of these Rules, every radio officer on board a radio-telegraph ship, which is provided with an auto-alarm equipment in compliance with the requirements of the Sixth Schedule, shall, whenever, radio watch ceases to be maintained during or at the end of his period of duty, connect the radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment with the ship's main aerial or with any other efficient aerial and put the radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment into operation.

(3) Every radio officer who, in compliance with sub-rule (2) leaves the  radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment in operation at the end of his period of duty shall, before he goes off duty—

(a) test the efficiency of the radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment;

(b) immediately inform the master or the navigating officer in charge of the navigation of the ship if he finds during the test that the radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment is not operating effectively.

(4)  Every radio officer who on resuming duty finds the radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment connected to an aerial, shall immediately test the efficiency of the equipment before making any adjustment thereto.

(5)  When a radio-telegraph ship is at sea, the radio officer or where there is more than one such officer the first radio officer, shall cause to be conducted —

(a) once a day, a test of the reserve telegraph transmitter connected with the artificial aerial provided in accordance with paragraph 12 of Part III of the First Schedule;

(b)  a test, once during every voyage, if the ship is engaged on international voyage, of the reserve radio-telegraph transmitter connected with the reserve aerial, if any;

(c) a test, once a day by voltmeter, and once a month by hydrometer, of any batteries which are a source of electrical energy for the radio-telegraph installation;

(d) once a day, a test, of any other source or electrical energy provided for the reserve radio-telegraph equipment;

(e) once a day, a test, of the audible alarm circuits and of the bells forming part of the radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment;

(f) once a day, a test, to check the proper functioning of the radio-telegraph auto-alarm receiver connected to its normal aerial, by listening to signals received by means of that receiver and by comparing them with  similar signals received on a frequency of 500 kc/s by means of the main receiver; and

(g) at least once a week, a test, of the transmitter forming a part of the fixed radio equipment for motor lifeboats, if any, or of the portable radio equipment for survival craft, using its artificial aerial.

(6)  When a radio-telegraph ship is at sea, the radio officer or, where there is more than one such officer on board the ship the first radio officer shall take all reasonable and practicable steps to cause the radio-telegraph installation and every part thereof to be properly maintained and, where necessary, repaired and adjusted.

(7)  The To officer shall cause to be fully charged as soon as possible all batteries which are used as source of electrical energy for any part of the radio-telegraph equipment, and which are found not to be fully charged.

Rule 16—Restriction of Use of Reserve Transmitter.

A transmitter forming part of the reserve radio-telegraph equipment shall not be used to transmit messages other than those relating to the safety of life at sea, unless such transmitter complies with the additional requirements specified in paragraph 6  of Part III of the First Schedule to these Rules.

Rule 17—Radio-Telegraph log Book.

(1) A radio-telegraph log book in the form specified in the Eighth Schedule to these Rules shall be kept in the radio-telegraph room on board every radio-telegraph ship registered in Ghana and it shall be available for inspection by any person authorised in that behalf by the Commissioner.

(2)  A radio officer on board a radio-telegraph ship registered in Ghana shall, when on duty, enter the following particulars in the log book: —

(a)  his name;

(b)  the hours he goes on and off duty;

(c)  the identifying number of each message transmitted or received by him together with date and time of such transmission or reception;

(d)  the station to which each message was transmitted or as the case may be, from which each such message was received; and

(e) a record of all incidents which occurred during the period he was on duty affecting the radio-telegraph equipment and its operation which appear to be of importance to the safety of life at sea.

(3)  The radio officer shall, in particular, enter the following in the log book as they occur together with the time of their occurrence, then is to say: —

(a) the full text of all messages transmitted or received by him which relate to immediate assistance required by persons in distress at or over the sea;

(b)  the full text of all messages transmitted or received by him which are preceded by an urgency signal or a safety signal;

(c) a record of the radio watch maintained by him during each of the silence periods;

(d) a record of any incident which occurs during his period of duty affecting the efficiency of the radiotelegraph equipment; and

(e) a record of the tests conducted by him in accordance with sub-rules (2) and (3) of rule 15 of these Rules together with the results of such tests.

(4) The radio officer, or, where there is more than one such officer the first radio officer shall cause the following entries to be made in the radio-telegraph log book:-

(a) a record of tests conducted in accordance with sub-rule (4) of rule 15 and sub-rule (1) of rule 28;

(b) a record of the charging of any batteries used as a source of electrical energy for the radio-telegraph installation; and

(c) in the case of a ship provided with a radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment, the details of any failures and repairs of such equipment.

(5)  The radio officer, or where there is more than one such officer the first radio officer shall make or cause to be made, at least once a day, an entry in the radio-telegraph log book of the time shown by the clock in each radio-telegraph room which he shall compare with Greenwich Mean Time and make necessary time correction on adjustment in respect of the clock.

(6) The radio officer, or where there is more than one such officer the first radio officer shall, unless the Ships' Rules otherwise require make or cause to be made, once a day, an entry in the radiotelegraph log book indicating in longitude and latitude, or by reference to a place, the approximate position of the ship.

(7) Where there is more than one radio officer on board a ship, the first radio officer shall inspect and sign each day the entries made in the radio-telegraph log book on that day, or, if this is not possible, on the following day.

(8) The master of the ship shall inspect and sign each day's entries in the radio-telegraph log book.

(9) The provisions of sections 160, 161 and 162 of the Act shall apply to radio-telegraph log book in the like manner as they apply to an official log book.

PART III—RADIO-TELEPHONY

Rule 18—Aerial.

(1) Every radio-telephone ship shall be fitted with an aerial and, in addition, shall carry—

(a)  a spare aerial completely assembled for rapid replacement of the main aerial, if the main aerial is a supported wire aerial;

(b)  a spare aerial complete with supporting structures and capable of rapid erection while the ship is at sea, if the main aerial is not a supported wire aerial.

(2)  Each of the halyards used for supporting the aerial on a radio-telephone ship of Class III and Class V (b) shall be fitted with a safety loop between the masthead or other aerial support and an aerial insulator.

(3) The safety loop shall consist of a part of the halyard which shall be not less than three feet long.

(4) The loop shall be closed by a link not more than fifteen inches long with a breaking load of not more than one-third of the breaking load of the aerial or the halyard, whichever is less.

(5) A rigging plan of the flitted aerial shall be available on board every radio-telephone ship and such plan shall show —

(a) the elevation and plan view of the aerial;

(b)  the height of the aerial in metres measured in the manner specified in sub-rule (3) of rule 19.

Rule 19—Range of Radio-Telephone Transmitters.

(1) The normal range of a radio-telephone transmitter shall be not less than 150 miles.

(2)  For the purposes of these Rules, the normal range of a radio-telephone transmitter shall be determined at the option of the owner of the ship either by calculation or by test.

(3)  The normal range of a radio-telephone transmitter, when determined by calculation on a frequency of 2182 kc/s, shall be calculated by ascertaining the product of the root mean square current in amperes at the base of the aerial and the maximum height of the aerial measured from the lead-out insulator.

(4) The transmitter shall be deemed to comply with the requirements of sub-rule (3) of this rule if the product so ascertained is not less than—

(a) 7.5 metre-amperes in case of an aerial with a horizontal top length of not less than one-half of its maximum height measured from the lead-out insulator; or

(b) 12.8 metre-amperes in the case of any other aerial.

(5)  The normal range of a radio-telephone transmitter, when determined by test, shall be the distance to which signals can be transmitted by such transmitter over the sea by day under normal conditions on a frequency of 2182 kc/s so as to set up at the receiver by the unmodulated carrier a total root mean square field strength of at least 25 microvolts per metre.

Rule 20—Supply of Electrical Energy.

(1) In every radio-telephone ship a supply of electrical energy shall be available from the ship's main source of electrical energy at all times while such ship is at sea and at all reasonable times while it is at port.

(2) The electrical energy shall be adequate for —

(a) the operation of the ship's radio-telephone installation;

(b) testing purposes; and

(c) the charging of batteries which are a source of electrical energy for the ship's radio-telegraph installation

(3) Where such electrical energy is supplied by a direct current it shall be of the correct polarity and unless otherwise provided, a metre to indicate the polarity shall be fixed close to the battery charging switch-board.

(4)  A reserve source of electrical energy shall be provided—

(a) in every radio-telephone ship of Class III in which the radio-telephone equipment is installed on or after the 1st day of July, 1963; and

(b) in every radio-telephone ship of Class IV and Class V in which the radio-telephone installation is other than an existing installation.

(5) The reserve source of electrical energy shall be placed as high in the ship as practicable unless the main source of electrical energy is so situated and is of such capacity as to be able to supply continuously for a period of six hours a total current equal to the sum of—

(a) one-half of the current required to operate a radiotelephone transmitter for the transmission of speech;

(b)  the current required to operate a radio-telephone receiver: and

(c) the current required by the electric lamp provided in accordance with rule 21 of these Rules.

(6) If a single battery is provided as a means of main or reserve electrical energy for operating the radio-telephone installation, an additional means shall be provided for—

(a)  operating the radio-telephone installation from the ship's main source of electrical energy; or

(b) float-charging the battery, in which case there shall be adequate protection against voltage rise.

(7) Such additional means shall be so designed as not to require the earthling of the ship's main source of electrical energy and adequate filtering shall, where necessary, be provided to prevent mains-borne interference from entering the radio equipment.

 

(8) The reserve source of electrical energy provided in accordance with sub-rule (4) of this rule shall not at any time be used except for the operation of —

(a) the radio-telephone installation; and

(b) electric lamp.

(9)  Notwithstanding the provisions of sub-rule (8) of this rule, the reserve source of electrical energy may, if the Commissioner so permits, be used to supply electrical energy to — 

(a) a direction finder, if fitted; and

(b) a low-power emergency  circuits which are wholly confined to the upper part of the ship.

(10) Any battery which is provided for a radio-telephone installation shall, when not in use, be capable of being fully charged within a period not exceeding sixteen hours.

Rule 21—Miscellaneous Requirements.

The following provisions shall apply to every radio-telephone ship, that is to say:

(a) the radio-telephone equipment shall be installed —

(i) as high in the ship as practicable; and

(ii)  in a position where there is least interference by extraneous noise or otherwise with the effective reception of radio signals;

(b) an efficient two-way means of communication independent of the ship's main communication system and main source of electrical energy, shall be provided between the place at which the radio-telephone equipment is installed and the place from which the ship is normally navigated;

(c)  a reliable clock shall be securely mounted in such a position that the entire dial can be easily and accurately observed from the operating position of the radio-telephone;

(d)  a reliable emergency lamp independent of the main lighting system of the ship shall be provided and it shall be so arranged as to be capable of providing adequate illumination of the radio-telephone the clock and the card of instruction;

(e)   where there is provided a reserve source of electrical energy the emergency lamp shall be an electrical lamp operated from that source and it shall be controlled by a two-way switch placed respectively near the entrance to the radio-telephone room and at the operating position of the radio-telephone;

(f) the switches shall be clearly labelled to indicate their purpose;

(g) a card of instructions giving a clear summary of the radio-telephone distress, urgency and safety procedures shall be displayed in full view of the radio-telephone operating position;

(h)  the tools, the measuring instruments, spare parts and other materials specified in Part II of the Fifth Schedule shall be provided and so kept as to be readily available for use at any time when the ship is at sea.

Rule 22—Qualifications for Radio-Telephone Operators.

(1) Every radio-telephone ship shall be provided with at least one radio-telephone operator.

(2)  No person shall be qualified to be appointed a radio-           telephone operator on board a Ghanaian ship unless he holds a valid general certificate of proficiency or competency in radio-telephony or a valid certificate in radio-telegraphy granted by —

(a) the Commissioner or any other person authorised by him in that behalf by a notification published in the Gazette; or

(b) a competent authority of any other country; provided the Commissioner approves such certificate and grants the holder thereof authority to operate radio-telegraph or radio-telephone ship registered in Ghana.

(3)  No person shall be deemed to be a qualified radio-telephone operator on board a ship registered in a country other the Ghana unless he holds a valid certificate of proficiency or competency in radio-telephony or radio-telegraphy granted by competent authority of the country in which the ship is registered.

Rule 23—Radio Watch.

(1)  Subject to sub-rule (2) of this rule, a continuous radio watch shall be maintained when a radio-telephone ship is at sea by a radio-telephone operator or if the radio-telephone installation is situated at such position in the ship from which the ship is normally navigated then by the master or such other officer or member of the crew who in either case is a qualified radio-telephone operator and is so appointed.

(2) Radio watch may be discontinued —

(a) when the receiver forming part of the radio-telephone installation is being used for traffic on a frequency other than 2182 kc/s and a second receiver as prescribed in Part III of the Second Schedule is not available; or

(b)  where, in the opinion of the master of the ship, the conditions are such that maintenance of radio watch may interfere with the safe navigation of the ship.

(3) Notwithstanding sub-rule (2) (b) of this rule, radio watch shall, as far as practicable, be maintained during silence periods.

Rule 24—Duties of Radio-Telephone Operators.

(1)  Every radio-telephone Operator must be familiar with the radio-telephone distress, urgency and safety procedures as set out in the card of instructions specified in rule 21 (g) of these Rules.

(2)  When a radio-telephone ship is at sea, the radio-telephone operator on board the ship shall cause batteries which are a source of electrical energy for the radio-telephone installation to be tested once a day and brought up to fully charged condition as soon as possible.

(3)  When a radio-telephone ship is at sea, the radio-telephone operator on board the ship shall test or cause to be tested at least once a week the transmitter forming part of the portable radio equipment for survival craft using its artificial aerial.

Rule 25—Radio-Telephone Log Book.

(1) A radio-telephone log book, in the form specified in the Ninth Schedule to these Rules, shall be kept in the radio-telephone room or at the place where radio watch is maintained on board  every radio-telephone ship registered in Ghana and it shall be made available for inspection by any person authorised in that behalf  by the Commissioner.

(2)  Every radio-telephone operator and any other person so authorised shall, when keeping radio watch in compliance with sub-rule (1) of rule 23 of these Rules enter his name and the following in the log book as they occur together with the time of their occurrence, that is to say:

(a) the times at which he begins and ends his period of radio watch;

(b)  the times at which the radio watch is discontinued and again resumed together with reasons for which the radio watch was discontinued;

(c) a summary of communications exchanged between the ship station and other stations whether on land or on ships;

(d) a record of all incidents which occurred during his period of radio watch affecting the radio-telephone installation and the operation thereof or which appear to him to be of importance to the safety of life at sea; and in particular, he shall make the following entries:—

(i) the general sense of all messages transmitted            and received by him which relate to immediate assistance required by persons in distress at or above the sea;

(ii) the general sense of all messages transmitted and received by him which are preceded by safety signal;

(iii) a record of the radio watch maintained by him during each of' the silence periods;

(iv) a record of any incident which occurs during his period of radio watch which affects, or in his opinion is likely to affect the efficiency of the radio-telephone installation; and

(v) a record in latitude and longitude, or by reference to a place, of the approximate position of the ship at least once a day.

(3) Every radio-telephone operator shall enter in the radio-telephone log book a record of the tests conducted by him in accordance with rules 24 (2) and 28 (2).

(4)  The radio-telephone operator, on board shall inspect           and sign each day the entries made in the radio-telephone log book.

(5) The master of the ship shall inspect and sign each day's entries in the radio-telephone log book.

(6)  The provisions of sections 160, 161 and 162 of the Act shall apply to radio-telephone log book in the like manner as they apply to an official log book.

PART IV—RADIO EQUIPMENT FOR MOTOR LIFEBOAT AND SURVIVAL CRAFT

Rule 26—Fixed Radio-Telegraph Installation for Motor Lifeboard.

(1)  The equipment required by rule 21 of the Merchant Shipping (Life Saving Appliances) Rules, 1972 (L.I. 1010) shall comply with the specifications set forth in Part 1 of the Fourth Schedule to these Rules.

(2)  A battery included in such equipment shall not be used for any purpose other than the operation of the equipment and of the searchlight provided in compliance with the said rules.

Rule 27—Portable Radio Equipment for Survival Craft.

The equipment required by rule 30 of the Merchant Shipping (Life Saving Appliances) Rules, 1975 (L.I. 1010) shall comply with the specifications set forth in Part II of the Fourth Schedule to these Rules.

Rule 28—Test of Radio Equipment for Motor lifeboat and Survival Craft.

(1) When a radio-telegraph ship provided with the equipment referred to in rule 26 or 27, as the case may be, is at sea, the radio officer or, if there are more than one such officers on board the ship, the first radio officer shall—

(a)  cause to be tested, the transmitter forming part of such installation or equipment at least once a week using its artificial, aerial; and

(b) cause any batteries other than self-priming batteries, which are a source of electrical energy for such installation or equipment, to be tested by voltmeter and hydrometer and brought up to fully charged condition as soon as possible.

(2) When a radio-telephone ship provided with the equipment referred to in rule 27 is at sea, the radio-telephone operator, shall cause to be tested at least once a  week the transmitter forming part of such equipment using its artificial aerial.

Rule 29—Application of Rules.

These rules shall apply to ships which are —

(a) seagoing Ghanaian ships;

(b) seagoing ships other than Ghanaian ships while these are within any port in Ghana; and are not—

(i) troopships;

(ii) ships not propelled by mechanical means;

(iii) pleasure yachts;

(iv) cargo ships of less than 300 tons or fishing boats of less than 100 tons.

Rule 30—Classification of Ships.

The ships specified in rule 29 to which these Rules apply shall be classified as follows: —

Class I       

(a)   Ghanaian ships certified to carry more than 250 passengers, being ships which are at sea for more than 16 hours between two consecutive ports;

(b) ships other than Ghanaian ships certified to carry more than 250 passengers, being ships which arrive at a port in Ghana after having been at sea for more than 16 hours since leaving the last port or being ships which seek clearance from a port in Ghana for a voyage requiring more than 16 hours at sea before reaching the next port of call.

Class II            ..        

(a)  passenger ships other than those of Class I;

(b) cargo ships of 1600 tons gross and upwards;

Class III           ..      

cargo ships of 500 tons gross. and upwards; but below 1600 tons gross.

Class IV           ..        

cargo ships of 300 tons gross and upwards;  but below 500 tons gross.

Class V            ..       

(a) fishing vessels of 1600 tons gross and upwards;

(b) fishing vessels of 100 tons gross and  upwards but below 1600 tons gross.

Rule 31—Interpretation.

In these rules, unless the context otherwise requires:

"Act" means the Merchant Shipping Act, 1963 (Act 183);

"cargo ship"  means a ship other than a passenger ship or a fishing vessel;

"classes of emission" in relation to—

(a) "Class A1" means telegraphy by on-off keying without the use of a modulating audio frequency;

(b) "Class A2" means telegraphy by the on-off keying of an amplitude-modulating audio frequency or audio frequencies, or by the on-off keying of the modulated emission;

(c)  "Class A3" means double side band amplitude modulated telephony

"Commissioner" means Commissioner responsible for Shipping;

"connected" means electrically connected;

"existing installation" means

(a) an installation wholly installed before the 25th day of May, 1965, and

(b) an installation part of which was installed before the 25th day of May, 1965, and the rest of which consists either of parts installed in replacement of identical parts or parts which comply with relative requirement of these Rules;

"interference" means any emission, radiation or induction which endangers the functioning of a radio navigation service or any other safety service or seriously obstructs or interrupts a radio communication service operating in accordance with these Rules or the International Radio Regulations, as the case may be;

"mile" means nautical mile of 6,080 feet;

"operating position" in relation to any equipment, means the position normally occupied by a person when operating that equipment;

"radio-telegraph ship" means a ship which is provided with a radio-telegraph installation and which is not a radio-telephone ship;

"radio-telephone ship" means a ship of not less than 100           tons gross but less than 1600 tons gross, the owner of which has given the Commissioner a notice in writing that the ship is provided with a radio-telephone installation in compliance with these Rules;

"radio watch" —

(a) in relation to a radio-telegraph ship, means listening for signals on the international distress frequency of 500 kc/s; and

(b) in relation to a radio telephone ship, means listening signals on the international distress frequency of 2182 kc/s:

"silence periods"

(a) in relation to radio-telegraphy, means periods f three minutes each beginning at 15 minutes and 45 minutes past the hour determined according to Greenwich Mean Time, and

(b) in relation to radio-telephony, means periods of three minutes each beginning at each hour and 30 minutes past the hour determined according to Greenwich Mean Time;

Rule 32—Commencement.

(1) These Rules shall be deemed to have come into force on the 12th day of July, 1974.

(2) These Rules shall in so far as they apply to fishing vessels take effect at the expiry of one year after the said date of commencement.

SCHEDULES

FIRST SCHEDULE

RADIO-TELEGRAPH INSTALLATION

PART I

Main Radio-Telegraph Transmitter

 

1. Performance

The main radio-telegraph transmitter (in this Part referred to as "the transmitter") provided on board a ship registered in Ghana shall comply with the performance specification for a Main Medium Frequency Radio-telegraph Transmitter manufactured in conformity with internationally accepted specifications.

 

2. General

The main radio-telegraph transmitter shall be provided with any equipment which may be necessary to enable it to be operated from the source of electrical energy referred to in rule 10 (1) of these Rules and shall be capable of being tuned to the main and reserve aerials referred to in rule 8 of these Rules.

 

3.  Frequency Ranges and Classes of Emission

The transmitter shall he capable of transmitting Class A1 and Class A2 emissions on 500 kc/s and at least four other spot frequencies in the range 405 to 525 kc/s.

 

4.  Modulation

When Class A2 emissions are being transmitted, the transmitter shall have a depth of modulation of not less than 70 per cent and a note frequency between 450 and 1350 c/s.

5.  Operating Facilities

(1) It shall be possible for an operator to change the transmitter from operating on one frequency to another frequency in a period not exceeding 10 seconds.

(2) The transmitter shall be ready for full-power operation within 60 seconds of switching on.

(3) The transmitter shall he capable of being used in conjunction with the automatic keying device specified in Part V of this Schedule.

(4) Means shall be incorporated to provide, in conjunction with an associated receiver, listening-through facilities at normal signalling speeds.

 

PART II

Main Radio-Telegraph Receiver

 

1.  Performance

The main radio-telegraph receiver (in this Part referred to as "the receiver") provided on board a ship registered in Ghana shall comply with the performance specification for a Main Radio Receiver manufactured in conformity with internationally accepted specifications.

 

2.  General

(1) The receiver shall be capable of' being operated from the source or electrical energy referred to in rule 10 (1) of these Rules.

(2) The receiver shall consist either of a single unit or of separate units each of which is capable of reception on one or more sections of the frequency range specified in paragraph 3 of this Part of this Schedule. Each unit of the receiver shall bear a plate stating the frequency range it is intended to cover.

(3) The receiver shall not employ any vibrators or primary batteries.

 

3.   Frequency Ranges and Classes of Emission

The receiver shall be capable of receiving signals within the frequency ranges and of the classes of emission specified in the following table:—

                               Frequency Range (inclusive)                 Class of Emission

15 kc/s-160 kc/s               ..          ..        Al

160 kc/s-1500 kc/s           ..          ..         Al. A2

1500kc/s-4mc/s                ..          ..        Al.A2,A3

4 mc/s-28 mc/s                 ..          ..        Al, A2. A3

 

4.  Reception Facilities

The receiver shall be capable of headphone and loud-speaker reception throughout the frequency range specified in paragraph 3 of this Part of this Schedule. The loud-speaker should he rendered inoperative when reception is by headphones.

 

5.  Sensitivity

The receiver shall have sufficient sensitivity to produce signals in headphones or by means of a loud-speaker when the receiver input is as low as 50 microvolts.

 

6.  Controls

The receiver shall be provided with —

(1) means for reducing the receiver sensitivity when the telegraph key is depressed so as to permit listening through at normal signalling speeds when an associated transmitter is operating in the same frequency hand:

(2) manual controls, as necessary, for the adjustment of radio and/or intermediate frequency gain and or audio frequency gain;

(3) means for enabling the operator to tune to any frequency in the same maritime mobile band within five seconds and within 15 seconds if the frequencies are in different bands;

(4) a tuning scale calibrated directly in frequency;

(5) a logging scale or other approved means for the accurate resetting of tune; and

(6) a fine control, the knob of' which shall be at least two inches in diameter, unless the frequency is adjustable in steps of 100 c/s or less.

 

7.  Radiation

The receiver when in use shall not produce a field exceeding 0.1 microvolt per metre at a distance of one mile from the receiver.

 

PART III

Reserve Radio-telegraph Transmitter

 

1.  Performance

The reserve radio-telegraph transmitter (in this Part referred to as "the transmitter") provided on board a ship registered in Ghana shall comply with the performance specification for a Reserve Medium Frequency Radio-telegraph Transmitter manufactured in conformity with internationally accepted specifications.

 

2.  General

The transmitter shall be provided with such equipment as may be necessary to enable it to be operated from the reserve source of electrical energy referred to in rule 10 (5) of these Rules, and shall be capable of being tuned to the main and reserve aerials referred to in rule 8 of these Rules.

 

3.  Frequency and Class of Emission

The transmitter shall be capable of transmitting Class A2 emission on a frequency of 500 kc/s.

 

4.  Modulation

The transmitter shall have a depth of modulation of not less than 70 per cent and a note frequency of between 450 and 1350 c/s.

 

5.  Operating Facilities

(1) The transmitter shall deliver 15 watts or at least 75 per cent of its full output, whichever is the greater, within six seconds of switching on.

(2) The transmitter shall be capable of being used in conjunction with the automatic keying device specified in Part V of this Schedule.

 

6.  Use for Normal Communications

If the transmitter is to be used otherwise than in an emergency or for the tests prescribed in rule 15 (5) of these Rules, paragraph 3 and sub-paragraphs (1) and (4) of paragraph 5 of Part I of this Schedule shall apply.

 

7.  Artificial Aerial

An artificial aerial shall be provided for testing the transmitter on full power.

 

PART IV

Reserve Radio-telegraph Receiver

 

1. Performance

The reserve radio-telegraph receiver (in this Part of this Schedule referred to as "the receiver") provided on board a ship registered in Ghana shall comply with the performance specification for a Reserve Radio Receiver manufactured in conformity with internationally accepted specifications.

 

2.  Frequency Ranges and Classes of Emission

The receiver shall be capable of receiving—

(a)  Class Al and A2 emissions on frequencies in the range 405 to 535 kc/s, and

(b) Class Al, A2 and A3 emissions on frequencies in the range 1605 to 3800 kc/s and throughout each of the maritime mobile bands  between 4 and 23 mc/s.

 

3.  Reception Facilities

(1) The receiver shall be capable of both headphone and loud-speaker reception throughout the frequency ranges specified in paragraph 2 of this Part. The loud-speaker shall be rendered inoperative when reception is by headphones.

(2) Where an associated transmitter is operated in the same frequency band, means shall be provided for reducing the receiver gain when the telegraph key is depressed, so as to permit listening through at normal signalling speeds.

 

4.  Sensitivity

The receiver shall have sufficient sensitivity to produce signals in headphones or by means of a loud-speaker when the receiver input is as low as 100microvolts.

 

5.  Source of Electrical Energy

The receiver shall be capable of operation both from the main source of electrical energy and the reserve source of electrical energy. Arrangements for quickly changing from one source of electrical energy to the other shall be provided.  No vibrators or primary cells shall be employed.

 

6.  Controls

The receiver shall be provided with—

(1) such manual controls as are necessary for the adjustment of radio and/or intermediate frequency gain and of audio frequency gain,

(2) a selectivity switch, suitably marked, and

(3) means for switching off the automatic gain control, and such means may be combined with the functions of a service switch.

 

7.  Radiation

The receiver when in use shall not produce a field exceeding 0.1 microvolt per metre at a distance of one mile from the receiver.

 

PART V

Radio-telegraph Automatic Keying Device

 

1.  Performance

The radio-telegraph automatic keying device (in this Part referred to as "the device") provided on board a ship registered in Ghana shall comply with the performance specification for an Automatic Keying Device manufactured in conformity with internationally accepted specifications.

 

2.  General

(1) The device shall be capable of sending automatically the signals specified in paragraph 3 of this Part when switched into circuit in place of the manuakey.

(2) Means shall be provided for quickly connecting and disconnecting the device, as required, to and from the main radio-telegraph transmitter, the reserve radio-telegraph transmitter and the radio-telegraph auto-alarm test signal generator referred to in paragraph 5 of the Sixth Schedule.

(3) If the device is electrically operated it shall be suitable for operation from the reserve source of electrical energy required by rule 10 (5) of these Rules.

 

3.  Signals

The device shall be capable of keying only the following signals when switched into circuit: —

(1)  the radio-telegraph alarm signal consisting of twelve four second dashes separated by one second spaces, the length of the dashes and spaces being maintained within a tolerance of plus or minus 0.2 second;

(2)  the radio-telegraph distress call consisting of the following signals in the following order:-

(a)  the radio-telegraph distress signal SOS, sent three times;

(b) the word DO;

(c) the ship's call sign, sent three times, and

(d) two dashes, each of 10 to 15 seconds duration.

 

4. Operating Facilities

The device shall be suitable for operation by an unskilled person.

 

PART VI

Radio-telegraph Loud-speaker Watch-keeping Receiver

 

1. Performance

The radio-telegraph loud-speaker watch-keeping receiver (in this Part referred to as "the receiver") provided on board a ship registered in Ghana shall comply with the performance specification for a Radio-telegraph Receiver for Loudspeaker Watch-keeping manufactured in conformity with internationally accepted specifications.

 

2.  General

(1) The receiver shall be fixed in tune on a frequency of 500 kc/s and shall be suitable for the reception of Class A2 emissions in the range 496 to 504 kc/s.

(2) The receiver shall include a loud-speaker.

(3) Provision shall be made for protecting the receiver when the ship's transmitter is radiating on 500 kc/s.

 

3.  Selectivity

The selectivity preceding the final detector shall satisfy the following requirements with the automatic gain control inoperative: —

Discrimination

(db relative to

Frequency (kc/s)                                                maximum response)

496 to 504         . .             . .          . .        Not more than 3

Below 487 and above 513   . .          . .        At least 40

Below 475 and above 525   . .          . .       At least 80

 

4. Standard Output Level

The standard audio-frequency output level shall be 50 milliwatts into a resistance substantially equal to the modulus of the impedance of the loud-speaker at 1,000 c/s.

 

5. Controls

(1) The receiver shall be provided with a manual gain control and an automatic gain control. Subject to the provisions of sub-paragraph (2) of this paragraph no controls other than a manual gain control and an on-off switch shall be available at the exterior of the receiver.

(2) If the receiver facilities are incorporated in a combined receiver that is to say in a reserve radio-telegraph receiver complying with Part IV of this Schedule or a radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment complying with the requirement of  Sixth Schedule—

(a) it shall be possible readily to set such combined receiver to the loud-speaker watch-keeping condition. If this setting is not by means of a single control, a positive indication shall be given by means of a lamp or when the receiver is in the 500 kc/s loud-speaker watch keeping condition;

(b) where the combined receiver is in the loud-speaker watch-keeping condition, controls of the reserve radio-telegraph receiver or radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment as the case may be, other than those referred to in sub-paragraph (1) of this paragraph, shall not affect its operation; and

(c) controls of the combined receiver which affect the operation when in a loud-speaker watch-keeping condition shall be clearly labelled.

 

6.  Radiation

The receiver when in use shall not produce a field exceeding 0. 1 microvolt per metre at a distance of one mile from the receiver.

 

SECOND SCHEDULE

RADIO-TELEPHONE INSTALLATION

PART I

Main Radio-telephone Installation

 

1.  Performance

The main radio-telephone installation (in this Part referred to as "the equipment") provided on board a ship registered in Ghana shall comply with the internationally accepted performance specification for Radio Equipment for use in ships compulsorily fitted with radio-telephony.

 

2.  General

In this Part the expression "the equipment" include a radio-telephone transmitter and receiver and all other equipment necessary for the operation of the installation, but does not include an aerial or a source of electrical energy.

 

3.  Frequency Ranges and Classes of Emission

(1) The equipment shall be capable of transmitting Class A3 emissions on a frequency of 2182 kc/s and of transmitting telephony on at least eight other spot frequencies.

(2) The equipment shall be capable of receiving Class A2 and A3 emissions on a frequency of 2182 kc/s and at least 20 other spot frequencies in the range 1605 to 3800 kc/s.

(3) Independent selection of transmit and receive frequencies shall be provided.

 

4.  Radio-telephone Transmitter

(1) The radio-telephone transmitter shall be provided with a device for generating the radio-telephone alarm signal specified in Part II of this Schedule.

(2) In normal operation the radio-telephone transmitter shall have a depth of modulation on 2182 kc/s of not less than 70 per cent at peak intensity.

 

5.  Radio-telephone Receiver

(1) The radio-telephone receiver shall have sufficient sensitivity to produce signals by means of a loud-speaker when the receiver input is as low as 50 microvolts.

(2) The radio-telephone receiver when in use shall not produce a field exceeding 0.1 microvolt per metre at a distance of one mile from the receiver.

 

6.  Source of Electrical Energy

The equipment shall be capable of operation from the source of electrical energy prescribed in rule 20.

 

7.  Operating Facilities

(1) The equipment shall be capable of being changed rapidly from "transmit" to "receiver" and vice versa and means shall be provided for protecting the receiver from damage when the equipment is transmitting.

(2) It shall be possible for an operator to change the transmitter from operation on one frequency to another frequency in a period not exceeding 10 seconds.

(3) The transmitter shall be ready for full-power operation within 60 seconds of switching on.

(4) The receiver shall have provision for both telephone receiver and loudspeaker reception.

 

8.  Controls

All controls shall be of such size as to permit normal adjustments to be made by a person wearing thick gloves.

 

PART II

Radio-telephone Alarm Signal Generating Device

 

1.  Performance

The radio-telephone alarm signal generating device (in this Part referred to as "the device") provided on board a ship registered in Ghana shall comply with the performance specification for a Radio-telephone Alarm Signal Generating Device (Audio Frequency) manufactured in conformity with the internationally accepted specifications.

 

2. General

(1) The device shall be capable of generating the radio-telephone alarm signal specified in paragraph 3 of this Part.

(2) The device shall be ready to generate the radio-telephone alarm signal within a period of 30 seconds from the time the device is energised and shall be capable of generating for a period of not less than 30 and not more than 60 seconds.

(3) After generating the radio-telephone alarm signal the device shall be ready to repeat the signal after an interval of not more than two minutes.

(4) Means shall be provided so that the device can be taken out of service at any time.

 

3. Alarm Signal

The radio-telephone alarm signal referred to in sub-paragraph (1) of paragraph 2 of this Part shall consist of two substantially sinusoidal tones, one having a frequency of 2,200 c/s plus or minus 1.5 per cent and the other 1,300 c/s plus or minus 1.5 per cent, produced alternately; the duration of each tone shall be 250 milliseconds plus or minus 50 milliseconds; the ratio of the amplitude of the stronger tone to that of the weaker shall be within the range 1 to 1.2.

 

4. Controls

(1) Not more than two operating control shall be available at the exterior of the device. Each control shall be clearly labelled to show its purpose and shall be such as to permit normal operation to be carried out by a person wearing thick gloves.

(2) Controls, where provided, for the adjustment of frequency, duration or level of the signal elements shall be preset controls not available at the exterior of the device.

 

PART III

Radio-Telephone Laud-speaker Watch-keeping Receiver

 

1. Performance

The radio-telephone loud-speaker watch-keeping receiver (in this Part referred to as "the receiver") provided on board a ship registered in Ghana shall comply with the internationally accepted performance specification for a Receiver (2,182 kc/s) for Loud-speaker Watch-keeping.

 

2. General

(1) The receiver shall be fixed in tune on a frequency of 2,182 kc/s and shall be suitable for the reception of Class A2 and A3 emissions except when the ship's own radio-telephone transmitter is radiating on 2.182 kc/s.

(2) The receiver shall include a loud-speaker.

(3) Provision shall be made for protecting the receiver and muting its output when the ship's transmitter is radiating on 2.182 kc/s.

 

3. Selectivity

The selectivity preceding the detector shall satisfy the following requirements:—

Discrimination

(db relative to maximum

                   Frequency (kc/s)                                                response)

2,178.5 to 2,185.5 inclusive                 ..          ..          ..          Not more than 6

Below 2,172 and above 2,192             ..          ..          ..          At least 30

Below 2,162 and above 2,202             ..          ..          ..          At least 60

Below 2,142 and above 2,222             ..          ..          ..          At least 80

 

4. Sensitivity

The receiver shall have sufficient sensitivity to produce signals by means of a loud-speaker when the receiver input is as low as 50 microvolts.

 

5.  Controls

(1) The receiver shall be provided with —

(a) a manual control labelled “RANGE” for the adjustment of radio frequency or intermediate frequency gain, or both;

(b) a preset control not available at the exterior of the receiver, for the adjustment of radio frequency or intermediate frequency gain, or both;

(c) a manual control labelled “VOLUME” for the adjustment of audio frequency gain; and

(d)  a preset control not available at the exterior of the receiver, for the adjustment of audio frequency gain.

(2) With the exception of the controls specified in sub-paragraphs (a) and (c) of sub-paragraph (1) of this paragraph and a receiver on-off switch, no other control shall be available at the exterior of the receiver.

 

6. Radiation

The receiver when in use shall not produce a field exceeding 0.1 microvolt per metre at a distance of one mile from the receiver.

 

THIRD  SCHEDULE

CLIMATIC AND DURABILITY TESTS

1. In this Schedule—

(1) references to Class B equipment shall be construed as references to equipment appropriated for use only below deck or in a deckhouse or other similar compartment;

(2) references to Class X equipment shall be construed as references to equipment appropriated for use or storage in the open or in an open boat.

2. Class B and Class X equipment shall be subjected to tests conducted in the order in which they appear in the following Table:—

 

TABLE

 

Nature of Test            Classes of equipment to which the test shall be applied 

Visual Inspection and Performance Test. .         . .         . .         . .            B and X         

Inspection under Vibration         . .         . .         . .         . .        . .    B and X         

Pump Test       . .         . .          . .          . .         . .         . .        . .      B and X         

Dry Heat Cycle            . .          . .          . .         . .         . .        . .      B and X         

Damp Heat Cycle         . .          . .          . .         . .         . .        . .    B and X         

Low Temperature Cycle            . .          . .         . .         . .        . .    B and X         

Rain Test         . .         . .          . .          . .         . .         . .        . .       X        

Immersion Test            . .          . .          . .         . .         . .        . .      X        

Corrosion Test . .         . .          . .          . .         . .         . .        . .     B and X        

Mould Growth Test       . .          . .          . .         . .         . .        . .     X        

Visual Inspection and Performance Test  . .         . .         . .        . .           B and X        

 

3. The tests referred to in paragraph 2 of this Schedule shall be conducted respectively in the manner specified in the performance specification for the Climatic and Durability Testing of Marine Radio Equipment manufactured in conformity with the internationally accepted specifications.

 

FOURTH SCHEDULE

RADIO EQUIPMENT FOR LIFEBOATS AND SURVIVAL CRAFT

PART I

 

Motor Lifeboat Fixed Radio Equipment

1. Performance

The motor lifeboat fixed radio equipment (in this Part referred to as “the equipment") provided on board a ship registered in Ghana shall comply with the performance specification for a Motor Lifeboat Radio Equipment manufactured in conformity with the internationally accepted specifications.

 

2. General

The equipment shall be so designed that it can be used in an emergency by an unskilled person.

 

3. Transmitter

(1) The equipment shall include a transmitter capable of sending continuously, but not simultaneously, Class A2 emissions on frequencies of 500 and 8364 kc/s and Class A3 emissions on a frequency of 2182 kc/s.

(2) In addition to a key for manual transmissions, the transmitter shall be provided with the automatic keying device specified in Part V of First Schedule.

(3) When Class A2 emissions are being transmitted, the carrier wave shall be modulated to a depth of 100 per cent by an approximately rectangular wave of frequency between 450 and 1350 c/s so that the carrier wave is switched on for 30 to 50 per cent of a modulation cycle.

(4) When Class A3 emissions are being transmitted, full modulation of the carrier wave by speech shall be possible.

(5) On the frequency of 500 kc/s the transmitter shall have a minimum normal range of 25 miles using the aerial referred to in paragraph 6 of this Part. For the purposes of this Part the normal range of the transmitter shall be calculated in accordance with the manner specified in Tenth Schedule.

 

4. Receiver

(1) The equipment shall include a receiver tunable over the ranges 488 to 513 kc/s and 8320 to 8745 kc/s for reception of Class Al and 2A emissions.

(2) The receiver shall also be capable of receiving Class A3 emissions on a spot frequency of 2182 kc/s.

(3) A manual gain control shall be provided.

(4) Reception shall be by watertight headphones shrouded to exclude external noise.

 

5. Source of Electrical Energy

(1) The equipment shall include a battery, composed of secondary cells, having such a capacity that, after continuously operating the transmitter (under full-power mark condition) for four hours, the voltage under full-load conditions shall not fall by more than 10 per cent.

(2) The battery shall not supply power to any engine starting-motor or ignition system.

(3) If it is intended to operate a searchlight from the battery, the capacity thereof shall be sufficient to provide for the additional load of the searchlight.

(4) The battery shall be capable of being recharged without being removed from the lifeboat—

(a) from a dynamo driven by the lifeboat's engine, and

(b) from the ship’s main source of electrical energy:

Provided that this in no way interferes with the launching of the lifeboat.

 

6. Aerial

The equipment shall include a single-wire aerial of high conductivity stranded or braided wire capable of being supported by the lifeboat mast without the use of top-masts at a height of at least 22 feet above the waterline.

 

7. Controls

The controls shall be clearly marked and of such size (in no case smaller than two inches in diameter) as will permit normal adjustments to be made by a  person wearing thick gloves.

 

8. Operating Facilities

The transmitter shall be ready for full-power operation within 30 seconds of switching on.

 

9. Artificial Aerial

An artificial aerial shall be provided for testing the transmitter on full power.

 

PART II

Portable Radio Equipment for Survival Craft

1. Performance

The portable radio equipment for survival craft (in this Part referred to as “the equipment”) provided on board a ship registered in Ghana shall comply with the internationally accepted performance specification for a Man-Powered Portable Radio Equipment for Survival Craft.

 

2. General

(1) The equipment shall be capable of use in both lifeboats and liferafts.

(2) The equipment shall be so designed that it can be used in an emergency by an unskilled person.

(3) The entire equipment, including the aerials specified in paragraph 6 of this Part shall be contained in a single unit and shall not exceed 30 lb. in weight.

(4) The equipment shall be watertight and capable of floating in water. Means shall be provided on the equipment for lowering but it shall be capable of being dropped in the stored condition, from a height of 30 feet into water without damage.

(5) Provision shall be made for securing the equipment, in the operating condition, to the person of the operator.

 

3. Transmitter

(1) The equipment shall include a transmitter capable of sending continuously, but not simultaneously, Class A2 emission on 500 and 8364 kc/s and Class A3 emissions on a frequency of 2182 kc/s.

(2) The equipment shall supply power of at least 10 watts input to the anode of the final stage or a radio frequency output of at least 2.0 watts (A2 emission) at 500 kc/s into an artificial aerial having an effective resistance of 15 ohms and 100 picofarads capacitance in series.

(3) In addition to a key for manual transmission, the transmitter shall be provided with an automatic keying  device for the transmission of the radio-telegraph alarm and distress signals and two dashes each of 10 to 15 seconds duration.

(4) The facilities for transmission on the frequency of 2182 kc/s shall include a device for the generation of the radio-telephone alarm signal specified in Part II of Second Schedule except that the duration of the radio-telephone alarm signal may be determined by manual control.

(5) When Class A2 emissions are being transmitted, the carrier wave shall be modulated to a depth of 100 per cent by an approximately rectangular wave of frequency between 450 and 1350 c/s so that the carrier wave is switched on for 30 to 50 per cent of a modulation cycle.

(6) When Class A3 emissions are being transmitted, full modulation of the carrier wave by speech must be possible.

 

4. Receiver

(1) The equipment shall include a receiver capable of receiving on 500 and 2182 kc/s.

(2) When the receiver is operating on 500 kc/s it shall be fixed tuned and suitable for reception of Class A2 emissions over the band 495 to 505 kc/s.

(3) When the receiver is operating on 2182 kc/s it shall be fixed tuned and suitable for reception of Class A3 emissions over the band 2177 to 2187 kc/s.

(4) The receiver shall be used with headphones that are watertight and of a form designed to exclude extraneous noise. These headphones shall be permanently  attached to the receiver.

 

5. Non-powered Generator

(1) The equipment shall include a man-powered generator capable of generating all the required electrical power.

(2) Means shall be provided, visible at all times to indicate that the generator is being operated within the normal range of generator speeds.

(3) The generator shall be so designed that it can be operated by one person or by two persons simultaneously, and that it cannot be rotated in the wrong direction.

 

6. Aerials

The equipment shall include—

(a) a single-wire aerial consisting of between 25 and 30 feet of high conductivity stranded or braided wire capable of being supported from a lifeboat mast without the use of topmasts at the maximum practicable height, and

(b) a collapsible rod aerial at least 16 feet in height or an alternative aerial of approved design, the base of which should not be greater than two inches in diameter, capable of being easily and quickly installed in a lifeboat and in a liferaft.

 

7. Controls

(1) All manual controls shall be of such size and form as to permit normal adjustment being performed by a person wearing thick gloves. The number of manual controls shall be kept to a minimum.

(2) The equipment shall incorporate manual send/receive switching and where necessary, in order to provide rapid change-over from "receive" to "send" there shall be a "transmitter standby" switch position.

(3) The operation of the manual controls shall not be impeded by nor shall it impede the generation of electrical energy.

 

8. Operating Facilities

The transmitter shall be ready for full-power operation within 30 seconds of switching on.

 

9. Transmitter Testing

There shall be provided—

(a) an artificial aerial within the equipment for short period testing of the transmitter on full-power; and

(b) means for testing the automatic transmission facilities without the generation of radio-frequency energy.

 

FIFTH SCHEDULE

TOOLS, MEASURING INSTRUMENTS, SPARE PARTS, ETC.

PART I

Radio-telegraph Ships

A—Tools

1 contact burnisher;

1 6 in. smooth file;

1 jointing knife;

1 pair 7 in. wireman's insulated pliers;

1 pair 6 in. long nose pliers with side cutters;

(a) 1 insulated screwdriver, not less than 8 in. in length, with  in. blade;

(a) 1 insulated grub screwdriver with 1/8 in. blade;

(a) I watch screwdriver with 1/16 in. blade;

(a) 1 set of spanners (Flat and Box) sizes 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 B.A.;

(a) 1 spanner adjustable to 1 in. gap;

(b) 1   in. hand drill;

(b) 1 set of high-speed twist drills, tapping and clearance sizes 0-8;

1 clamp vice;

1 electric soldering iron to suit ship's voltage with a power consumption of not less than 40 watts or more than 70 watts;

1 electric soldering iron to suit ship's voltage with a power consumption of not more than 25 watts;

1 dusting brush;

1 lb. ball pane hammer;

1 hacksaw and blades;

A tool box or compartment for containing the foregoing tools and capable of being locked.

 

B—Measuring Instruments

1 hydrometer;

1 dipping fahrenheit thermometer;

An ammeter capable of measuring direct current from 1 milliamper to 500 milliamperes; a voltmeter capable of measuring alternating and direct current voltage from 1 volt to 1,000 volts; and an ohmmeter capable of measuring resistance from 10 ohms to 20,000 ohms; provided that a measuring instrument in which the requirements for an ammeter, a voltmeter and an ohmmeter specified above are combined may be substituted for the said instruments.

 

C—Spare Parts and Spare Equipment

1 set of brushes for each machine installed;

3 cartridges for each cartridge fuse in use;

1 main aerial made up (wire only);

1 safety loop for aerial;

50 per cent of the number of insulators in use (excluding lead-in insulators);

100 per cent of the number of shackles and thimbles in use;

12 bulldog grips to suit the aerial wire;

1 set of telephones and leads (with plugs if used) for each type of telephones and leads in use;

1 valve for each two of the first six of each type of valve in use, and then

1 valve for each additional 3 valves or part of 3 valves of that type in use;

3 vibrators for each type of vibrator in use;

1 indicator lamp for each indicator lamp in use;

1 emergency lamp;

1 charging mat if a mat-type charging unit is in use.

 

D—Miscellaneous Items

4 oz. petroleum jelly;

3 sheets glass paper;

8 oz. resin-cored solder;

4 oz. insulating tape;

2 oz. lubricating oil for general purposes;

(c) pint lubricating oil;

lb. grease suitable for machine in use;

10 yards of each rating of fuse wire, 1 ampere, 5 ampere and 15 ampere;

1 length of aerial wire equal to the length of the reserve aerial plus 10 feet (uncut);

4 oz. copper binding wire;

6 yards flexible wire (5 ampere) for adjustable connections;

4 oz. trichloroethylene for contact cleaning.

__________________________________

(a) Where special nuts and screws are used for fastening, suitable tools shall be provided.

(b) These items need not be provided in ships other than those engaged on international voyage.

(c) This item need only be supplied where a machine lubricated with oil forms part of the installation.

 

PART II

Radio-telephone Ships

A—Tools

1 6 in. smooth file;

1 jointing knife;

(a) 1 insulated screwdriver, not less than 8 in. in length, with  in. blade;

(a) 1 spanner adjustable to 1 inch gap;

1 hacksaw and blades.

 

B—Measuring Instruments

1 hydrometer.

 

C—Spare Parts and Spare Equipment

50 per cent of the number of insulators in use (excluding lead-in insulators).

 

D—Miscellaneous Items

10 yards of each rating of fuse wire, 1 ampere, 5 ampere and 15 ampere.

_____________________________________

(a) Where special nuts and screws are used for fastening, suitable tools shall be provided.

 

SIXTH SCHEDULE

RADIO-TELEGRAPH AUTO-ALARM EQUIPMENT

 

A—Performance

1. The radio-telegraph auto-alarm equipment (in this Schedule referred to as “the equipment”) provided on board a ship registered in Ghana shall comply with the performance specification for a Radio-telegraph Automatic Alarm Equipment for ships manufactured in conformity with the internationally accepted specifications.

 

B—General

2. (1) The equipment shall—

(a) include an audible alarm system, a receiver, a test signal generator, monitoring facilities and a selector;

(b) in the absence of interference of any kind be capable without manual adjustment of giving audible warning of the receipt of a radio-telegraph alarm signal transmitted on a frequency of 500 kc/s and consisting of a series of twelve consecutive dashes, each with a duration of four seconds and separated by intervals of one second, in each case subject to the tolerances specified in paragraph 7 of this Schedule, provided that the strength of the signal at the receiver input is greater than 100 microvolts and less than 1 volt.

(2) In order that the equipment shall distinguish an alarm signal in the presence of interfering signals automatic control of receiver gain shall be provided.

 

C—Audible Alarm System

3. (1) An audible alarm system shall have provision to operate simultaneously a bell on the bridge, a bell in the radio-telegraph room and a bell in the sleeping room of the radio officer.

(2) The audible alarms shall be actuated by a radio-telegraph alarm signal or shall operate in the event of a sustained failure of the power supply.

(3) Only one switch for stopping the audible alarms shall be provided and this shall be situated in the radio-telegraph room.

 

D—Receiver

4. (1) The receiver shall be suitable for the reception of Class A1 emissions and of Class A2 emissions having a note frequency between 400 and 1400 c/s, the carrier wave being in the frequency range 496 kc/s to 504 kc/s.

(2) The radio frequency response of the receiver shall be uniform to within 3 dt in the frequency band 496 to 504 kc/s.

(3) The receiver when in use shall not produce a field exceeding 0.1 microvolt per metre at a distance of one mile from the receiver.

 

E—Test Signal Generator

5. For the purpose of regularly testing the equipment it shall include a generator pre-tuned to a frequency within plus or minus 3 kc/s of 500 kc/s, a manual key of a non-locking type and means for connecting the automatic keying device specified in Part V of First Schedule to these Rules.

 

F—Monitoring Facilities

6. The receiver shall have provision for headphone and loud-speaker reception of class A2 emissions.

 

G—Selector

7. (1) The selector in conjunction with the receiver shall—

(a) accept dashes of from 3.5 seconds to 6.0 seconds duration and spaces between dashes of not more than 1.5 seconds duration, and

(b) reject dashes of a duration of 3.4 seconds or less or dashes of 6.2 seconds or greater and spaces between dashes of 1.6 seconds or greater duration.

(2) The selector shall actuate the audible alarms only after correct registration of a chosen number of consecutive dashes. The chosen number of consecutive dashes shall be either three or four. Correct registration of the fourth consecutive dash may include any time of duration of the fourth dash greater than 3.5 seconds.

 

SEVENTH SCHEDULE

TABLE OF WATCH HOURS

 

 

Zones

(1)      

Western Limits

(2)      

Eastern Limits

(3)       HOURS OF WATCH

(GREENWICH MEAN TIME)          

16 Hours

(4)       8 Hours

(5)      

 

A. Eastern Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean, North Sea, Baltic    

Meridian of 30 W., Coast of Greenland   

Meridian of 30 E. to the South of the Coast of Africa, Eastern limits of the Mediterranean, of the Black Sea, and of the Baltic, Meridian of 30 E. northwards from the coastline of Norway. From

0h.

8h.

16h.

20h.     To

6h.

14h.

18h.

22h.     From

8 h.

12h.

16h.

20h.     To

10h.

14h.

18h.

22h.    

 

B. Western Indian Ocean, Eastern Arctic Ocean. Eastern Limit of Zone A.      Meridian of 80 E. Western Coast of Ceylon to Adam’s Bridge, thence Westward round the coast of India, Meridian 80 E. to northwards from the coast line of the U.S.S.R.  0h.

 4h.

12h.

16h.

20h.     2h.

10h.

14h.

18h.

24h.     4h.

 8h.

12h.

16h.

  -         6h.

10h.

14h.

18h.

  -        

 

C. Eastern Indian Ocean, China Sea, Western Pacific Ocean, Eastern Arctic Ocean.           Eastern Limit of Zone B.           Meridian of 160 E. as far as the coast of Kamchatka, Meridian of 160 E. northwards from the coastline of the U.S.S.R.      0h.

 8h.

12h.

16h.     6h.

10h.

14h.

22h.     0h.

 4h.

 8h.

12h.     2h.

 6h.

10h.

14h.    

D. Central Pacific Ocean     Eastern Limit of Zone C.      Meridian of 140 W   0h.

 4h.

 8h.

12h.

20h.     2h.

 6h.

10h.

18h.

24h.     0h.

 4h.

 8h.

20h.

  -         2h.

 6h.

10h.

22h.

  -        

E. Eastern Pacific Ocean.   Eastern Limit of Zone D.      Meridian of 90 W. as far as the coast of Central America, thence Western coast of Central America and of North America       0h.

 4h.

 8h.

16h.     2h.

 6h.

14h.

22h.     0h.

 4h.

16h.

20h.     2h.

 6h.

18h.

22h.    

F. Western Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico.     Meridian of 90 W., Gulf of Mexico, Eastern Coast of North America.        Meridian of 30 W. coast of Greenland.     0h.

 4h.

12h.

20h.     2h.

10h.

18h.

22h.     0h.

12h.

16h.

20h.     2h.

14h.

18h.

22h.    

 

EIGHT SCHEDULE

FORM OF RADIO-TELEGRAPH LOG-BOOK—RADIO-TELEGRAPH LOG

PART I

 

Name of Ship            Official Number and  International Call Sign          Port of Registry         Gross Tonnage           

 

 

 

                                               

Name of Company operating the Radio Service……………………………………………

 

Port at which and date when voyage commenced            Nature of the voyage or employment          Port at which and date when voyage terminated  

 

Date………………………..

Port………………………..              

Date……………………….

Port……………………….   

 

Delivered to the Shipping Master of the Mercantile Marine Office at the Port of …………………………………………………………………………………….. on the ………………………….. day of ………….. 19 ……..… together with Radio-telegraph Log Part II, serial numbers ……………………….…………………………………….. to

……………………………….                                          ………………………………

            Countersigned                                                                            Master

……………………………….                                           ……………………………..

   Shipping Master                                                                           Address

 

SECTION A—PARTICULARS OF RADIO STAFF

 

Name  Home Address          Certificate Number and Class        

 

 

 

SECTION B—PARTICULARS OF BATTERIES ON BOARD

 

Battery Number         Number of Cells        Type    Date Supplied           Voltage and Ampere—Hour Capacity            Purpose for which used       

 

 

 

SECTION C—DAILY EXAMINATION OF BATTERIES

 

Date    Battery Number         Voltage off Load       Voltage on Load       Remarks       

 

 

 

 

SECTION D—MONTHLY REPORT OF BATTERIES

 

Date    Battery Number and cell Number    SPECIFIC GRAVITY AS MEASURED     

Remarks       

Date    Battery Number and cell Number    SPECIFIC GRAVITY AS MEASURED     

Remarks       

Before Charge          After Charge  Before Charge          After Charge 

 

 

 

 

PART II

RADIO-TELEGRAPH LOG

 

Name of Ship            Official Number and International Call Sign           Port of Registry         Gross Tonnage           

 

Serial No……………………….. from………………. to ……………….....…….

Name of Company operating the Radio Service……………………………………

S.S…………………………...….…….

M.V…………………..………………

 

DIARY OF THE RADIO-TELEGRAPH SERVICE

 

Date and Time (G.M.T.)       Station From  Station To      Full Details of Calls, Signals and Distress Working as prescribed by rule 17      Frequency     

 

 

                                                           

 

NINTH SCHEDULE

FORM OF RADIO-TELEPHONE LOG-BOOK

RADIO-TELEPHONE LOG

 

Name of Ship            Official Number         Port of Registry         Cross Tonnage        

 

 

 

Name of Company operating the Radio Service …………………………………….........

Period covered by Log From ……………………. To ………………………………

Delivered to the Shipping Master of the Mercantile Marine Office at the Port of …………...................................………………...............….. on the ………........………… day of ……………………….. 19………......................…...

………………………                                    …………………………..................…..

       Countersigned                                                       Master

………………………..                                 ………….............................…….....…..

   Shipping Master                                                         Address

 

SECTION A—PARTICULARS OF RADIO-TELEPHONE OPERATORS

 

Name  Home Address          Certificate Number and Class        

 

 

 

S.S………………………………………...…..

M.V…………………………………….............……

 

SECTION B—DIARY OF THE RADIO-TELEPHONE SERVICE

 

Date and Time (G.M.T.)       Station From  Station To      Frequency Used        Record of Working as Prescribed by rule 25.         

 

 

 

 

 

TENTH SCHEDULE

RANGE OF RADIO-TELEGRAPH TRANSMITTERS

1. For the purposes of this Schedule the normal range of a radio-telegraph transmitter when determined by calculation on a frequency of 500 kc/s, shall be calculated in the manner specified in paragraph 2 or 3 of this Schedule.

2. (1) In the case of all types of transmitting aerials, except “L” and “T” types, the product of (Ic) the effective radiation current in amperes and (He) the effective height in metres of the aerial shall be calculated and converted to miles in accordance with the following table:—

Product in metre                                         Equivalent in

                              amperes                                                         miles

       56                                                                  175

                               44                                                                  150

                               21                                                                  100

                               15                                                                    75

                                 5                                                                    25

(2) The effective radiation current (Ie) shall be obtained by multiplying the root mean square (RMS) current in amperes fed into the aerial system by a factor Cr/Ct which shall be determined by the ratio of the radiation capacitance (Cr) to the total measured capacitance (Ct).

(3) The radiation capacitance (Cr) shall be obtained from the product of the radiation length (Lr) and the capacitance per unit length as given in the following table:—

Radiation Length (Lr)

                            Diameter of aerial                                 pf per metre

     25                                              15.4

     35                                              14.0

     50                                              12.9

     70                                              11.9

   100                                              11.1

   200                                                9.8

   400                                                8.7

   600                                                8.2

   800                                                7.8

1,500                                                 7.2

3,000                                                 6.6

6,000                                                 6.0

 10,000                                                 5.7

(4) The radiation length shall be as follows:—

(a) Single vertical aerial without capacitive loading—Radiation length (Lr) = measured length of aerial in metres;

(b) Single vertical aerial with top capacitive loading—Radiation length (Lr) = measured length of aerial + 2 times the diameter of loading structure in metres:

(c) Other  types of aerial

Radiation length (Lr) = total length of conductor (vertical and horizontal).

(5) The radiation capacitance of N similar vertical aerials joined in parallel shall be taken to be N times the radiation capacitance of one provided the spacing between them is greater than Lr/4.

(6) The total capacitance (Cr) of the aerial shall be obtained by measurement using a capacitance bridge.

(7) The ratio Cr/Ct shall be multiplied by the measured RMS current in amperes fed into the aerial system to give the effective radiation current (Ie).

(8) The effective height of the aerial (He) shall be obtained by measurement of the vertical distance from the load line mark indicating the greatest depth to which the ship may at any time or any place be submerged in accordance with the Lord Line Rules or, if there is no such mark on the ship, from the mean level of the surface of the water in which the ship is afloat, to the base of the aerial, plus  half the radiation length (Lr) of the aerial or its physical height, whichever is the smaller.

3. In the case of transmitting aerials of the “L” and “T” types the product of the root mean square current in amperes at the base of the main aerial and the maximum height in metres of the aerial measured from the load line mark indicating the greatest depth to which the ship may at any time or place be submerged in accordance with the Load Line Rules or, if there is no such mark on the ship, from the mean level of the surface of the water in which the ship is afloat, shall be converted to miles in accordance with the following table:—

 Product in metre                    Equivalent in

   Amperes                               Miles

102                                175

   76                                150

   45                                100

   34                                  75

   10                                  25

 

COLONEL P.K. AGYEKUM

Commissioner Responsible for Shipping

Date of Gazette Notification: 6th June, 1975.

 

 

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